The word ‘genealogy’ is pronounced …

gee nee al o gy

that is, it is not pronounced

jen e al o gy

My understanding of Webster’s definition is that the E in genealogy is alike with that in ‘easy.’ I’ve heard some podcast speakers and others trying to make it sound like gen et ic, but it’s not; they are two separate words with two separate meanings.

Thanks, folks!

NPM

 

Review: J. Horace Round’s Family Origins and other Studies

 

I’ve been reading Family Origins, by J. Horace Round.[1] It is an interesting book, not only because it discusses an area of genealogy which I’m interested in learning more about. It has an interesting introduction about “historical genealogy,” a subject that has gotten a lot of press recently as “historical biography.”

Mr. Round (1854–1928), an Englishman, was a prolific author of texts on early British genealogies, focusing primarily in Family Origins on those ranging back to Norman times and the conquest of England by William the Conqueror. In this particular introduction, Round describes a “new” school of genealogists who take pride in sourcing their research and citing it. He also discusses the historical bases for genealogical research in England, with passing reference to American genealogy. These discussions pre-date even Donald Lines Jacobus, the premiere American genealogist of the 20th century.

Family Origins dissects, deconstructs, and straightens out various pedigrees going back to Norman and medieval times. Knowledge of archaic Latin and French may be helpful in reading some of the quoted passages, however; but due to Round’s explication of the texts, it may also be unnecessary.

The text goes into some detail on the importance of not only names, but also places. The importance of place in historical genealogy, as Mr. Round practiced it is that one must know the place where the name originated, as it was often taken from the place where the people lived. In the case of the peerages Mr. Round discusses, these places are sometimes in Normandy, part of the France of the time, on which he focuses much of his research.

An example of Mr. Round’s diligence in the study of genealogy is the following quote from page 107:

“It is … of real importance for the critical study of genealogy, to collect and set on record, cases in which evidence has been forged or falsely alleged to exist, for the purpose of affording proof of a wholly fictitious pedigree.”

The statement here quoted pre-dates even E. S. Mills and the Genealogical Proof Standard as goals against which we work. It goes directly to the goals of the Board for Certification of Genealogists’ ethics, which it also pre-dates.

Round seems to take delight in demolishing various pedigrees found in the Burke peerages and their brethren. He also takes on other genealogists’ work and dissects them live, in front of the reader as if he were there discussing them with you. That is the kind of genealogical writing I like at the moment. This book makes good bed-time reading, so the lessons can sink in and be absorbed.

1. Round, J. Horace. Family Origins and other Studies. London, 1930. Reprint Baltimore, Md.: Clearfield Company, 1998.

 

A Featured Article in the In Depth Genealogist

Wrote an article awhile ago and submitted it to the IDG little thinking that this is what they would do to it. Thanks, folks!

Sunday’s Obituary: Charles Carey, from The Oregonian

Death Takes Charles Carey

Charles E. Carey, 55, one-time chief consulting engineer of the Bonneville power administration and a pioneer in Columbia river development, died Sunday at the Veterans’ hospital in Sawtelle, Cal., after an illness of several months. Western regional director of the United States bureau of reclamation at the time of his death, he was transferred to Sacramento, Cal., as engineer in charge of power and sales at the Central Valley project in December 1941.

Bonneville Posts Held

He was a member of the Columbia river survey committee of the national resources planning board and came to the Bonneville project as rate engineer, advancing to chief consulting engineer in 1939. He was appointed acting administrator of Bonneville power in February, 1939, when James D. Ross became ill and carried on in this capacity after Ross’ death for many months. Following appointment of a permanent administrator, Carey was named assistant chief of the administration’s system planning and marketing division. In August, 1940. He held this position until his transfer to California the following year.

His long experience in the power field began when he took a job as a journeyman electrician at the age of 15. He later worked his way through the University of Oklahoma.

He designed and built the electrical transmission system for the Bonneville and Grand Coulee dams, and had taught electrical engineering at the University of New Mexico, was head of the power division of the bureau of the budget in Washington and was employed for a time by the Seattle, Wash., municipal power system.

His widow, Verle, and a daughter, Marjorie, of Sacramento, survive.

 —

The Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, 1 September 1945, page 13.

The Oregonian 1 September 1945 901, p. 13

Sunday’s Obituary: John Fredric Neumann, Portland, Oregon

 

Retired Road Employe Dies

Retired Worker Served County

Ten sons and daughters and a widow survive John Fredric Neumann, who died Wednesday at his home in St. Johns at the age of 78. Mr Neumann was a farmer, carpenter and saw-mill operator for many years. He retired in June 1948, after 18 years as an employe of the Multnomah county road department. Born in Germany on March 28, 1872, Mr. Neumann was brought to the United States as a child and became a citizen at 21. He was married September 5, 1895, to Augusta A. R. Block in Howard Lake, Minn.

Mr. Neumann brought his family west to Ridgefield, Wash., in 1924. They lived there until 1929 when they moved to Cornelius Pass, Or. Since 1943 Mr. and Mrs. Neumann have lived at 8323 N. Princeton street.

Mr. Neuman is survived by eight brothers and sisters, 29 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren. Surviving sons and daughters are Arnold and Anthony Neumann of Portland, Harry Neumann, Murphy, Or.; Martin Neumann, Scappoose; Mrs. Myrtle Maschke, Portland; Mrs. Martha Barnes, Vancouver, Wash.; Mrs. Elsie Hirsch, Howard Lake, Minn.; Mrs. Alice Bauer, Vancouver, Wash.; Mrs. Margaret Terpening, Vancouver, Wash., and Mrs. Gertrude Rosevear, Kalama, Wash.

Funeral services will be Saturday at 11 a. m. at the St. Johns funeral home. Interment will be at Columbia cemetery.

 —

The Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, 1 September 1950, page 13.

The Oregonian, 1 September 1950, page 13