Friday Funnies – A Mousic Obituary

OBITUARY

The following mousic obituary is taken from the Portsmouth Evening Times:

In this city, Dec. 1st, “James D.” mouse, owned by Mr. James D. Potter, (colored) of this city, formerly of Port[l]and, at the age of 4½ years of old age and paralysis of the heart. This was a common gray mouse which Mr. Potter had trained and exhibited in many cities in this country and Canada. The mouse was forwarded to Boston by express this morning to be stuffed and when returned will be placed in the little cage which has been his home for 4 years. The mouse funeral will be held in City Hall. A special invitation has been extended to Chandler’s band and Neal Dow to be present. The mouse was insured in Chicago for one hundred dollars and Mr. Potter says he would not have taken $500 for it and will wear mourning all over his face as long as he lives. [Montreal, Chicago and Portland papers please copy.

Daily Eastern Argus, Portland, Maine, Wednesday, 6 December 1882, page 1, column 7.

Surname Saturday: Richard Mellen

Looking at the directory entry for Richard Mellen in Robert Charles Anderson’s The Great Migration Directory, I found a reference to Ernest Flagg’s Genealogical Notes on the Founding of New England.

In Flagg’s book I see two pages of information about the first couple of generations of Richard’s family. Much of the material is copied from Thomas Bellows Wyman’s Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown (see volume 2).

What I find interesting is that there is no reference to Simon Mellen, an alleged son of Richard’s. Wyman’s Genealogies include Simon in the entry for Richard, but he was basing his conclusion on the assumption that there was a direct familial relationship between the two. Many online trees contain a connection between the two, but I do not think that there is any factual evidence to say one way or the other. I have covered both families separately and together in separate places with extensive research into each. See Richard Mellen, a 3-Generation Study, and the Simon Mellen genealogy, for further information.

The only reason I included Simon in my coverage of Richard’s family was to make a point about the possibility they were related. My educated guess is still that they are not related as father and son. They may have been brothers or cousins, but we still do not know how.

Thoughts?

NPM

Amended Sketch of Moses Cushing Maling

3. Moses Cushing3 Maling (Thomas2, John1) was born in Maine on 19 November 1819.[1] He died on 6 October 1893[2] and was buried at Hope Cemetery, Kennebunk Village[3]He married at Kennebunkport, on 5 July 1847 Olive Porter Chadbourne, daughter of Elisha Chadbourne and Susannah Lord.[4]Olive was born at Kennebunk, on 17 March 1824, and she died at Kennebunk, on 20 December 1878.[5] She was buried at Hope Cemetery, Kennebunk Village.[6] Moses married second, on 11 October 1886, Lucia Wells (Nason) Folsom, daughter of Benjamin and Olive (–) Nason.[7] Lucia was born on 14 March 1834 at South Berwick, York County, Maine,[8] and she died at York, Maine, on 9 October 1920.[9]

Notes

1, 2, 3, Moses Maling’s gravestone. Photograph, Taken 29 November 2002, Photographed by G. C. C. Maling, The Author (Seattle, King Co., Washington).

4, Marriage publication date of 13 June 1847 from Chadbourne genealogy. The Kennebunkport Historical Society materials state 5 July 1849 for the marriage date, which is after Mary Abby’s birth in May 1849. Elaine Chadbourne Bacon, compiler, The Chadbourne Family in America: A Genealogy (North Waterboro, Maine: Chadbourne Family Association, 1994), 157; Maling family in Kennebunkport area, family information file, October 1995 Kennebunkport Historical Society.

5, 6, see note 1.

7, Maine Marriages, 1771–1907, database online, familysearch.org.

8, 9, Maine Vital Records, 1670-1921, database online, FamilySearch.org.

See also: Maling Family Resources for more materials on Moses.

Richard Mellen of Massachusetts 3-Generation Study

Richard Mellen of Massachusetts is a brief genealogy of the Mellen family compiled from numerous primary and published records. Richard Mellen is a relatively unknown and unknowable persona. Very little is known about him, even where and when he died is unknown. The introduction gives background on the family and their relations. Also included are notes on the family’s surname, places, and records involved. A three-generation genealogical summary is presented in the NEHGS Register style. This paper is also a preview of a forthcoming 10-generation study of the Simon Mellen (c1636-1694) family which will be published and made available for sale elsewhere.

[Update 22 October 2011: The Simon Mellen study is scheduled for publication in December 2011.]

[Update 01 October 2021: The Richard Mellen 3-generation study is now available for sale here.]

Updates to the Wyeth Family Project

One of my current projects is to document the Wyeth family of New England through the 1600s to the 1900s. The progenitor of the family was Nicholas Wyeth, born in England and emigrated to Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts during the early part of the Great Migration. He died in 1680. He was my 10th great-grandfather.

The genealogy itself, while only partly documented, is coming along nicely. I’ve been touching it off and on for several years now. Parts of this genealogy I’ve lifted off of the Internet. I’ve been looking for documents to back up the assertions made in that version. Some of the undocumented materials seem to be based on personal knowledge and recent events, so there should be documents online.

The genealogy as it exists right now is about 25 8.5” x 11” inch pages with footnotes. It is in a fairly strict NEHGS Register style. I plan to post it somewhere in the future, but not just yet since there is unfinished business with the more recent family sketches. Since it is a fairly short document, perhaps growing to 50 or so pages, I’ll probably not publish it on Amazon or Lulu, where my other publications are available.

One of the more interesting parts I’ve found is: Ruth Shepard, who married William Wyeth (1657-1703), was not the daughter of Thomas Shepard, born say 1635-1637 and died at Milton, Massachusetts 26 September 1719, and Hannah Ensign, born probably at Scituate, Massachusetts circa 1638 (baptized at Hingham, Massachusetts 6 July 1640) and died at Malden, Massachusetts 14 March 1697/8. [Robert E. Bowman, “Ensigns Revisited,” The American Genealogist, 73 (October 1998), 249.] Who she was seems to remain a mystery.

Some of the families covered, in particular the New England families, I’ve fairly completely documented, but trailing the others will be a challenge. Since they seem to have dispersed across the country, some to Washington state and some to the western states, I’ve got my work cut out for me.