What could be better? Books? Genealogy? Both!

I’ve been watching Just Genealogy on YouTube and it is fascinating. Cliff Scott, a prominent genealogist hosts short, highly informative clips on genealogy and books.

Mr. Scott is proprietor of Heritage Books, a long-time fixture in the history and genealogy business. He has branched out to YouTube to present new books in his stock and discuss them with viewers. He also accepts viewer questions to address such issues as “I’ve looked at all the records, now what?”

His regular clips on the genealogy standards put out by the Board for Certification of Genealogists are also interesting. He analyzes and comments on the basis for each standard in the revised second edition of the guide, here.

This is an engaging series that I’ll keep an eye on.

Thanks, Mr. Scott!

NPM

Genealogy as a Form of Data Analysis

This paper is loosely based on the Wikipedia article entitled “Data Analysis” and the book Mastering Genealogical Proof.

Genealogists use raw data to accumulate and analyze patterns and trends toward establishing a Genealogical Proof. Evidence in the genealogical community is generally understood as pieces of data that are arranged through collection, sifting, and arranging. Evidence, positive or negative, is acquired through examining and modeling data using generally accepted processes. One such process is to use the computer application Evidentia. Other processes enabling the development of evidence are those used in the legal and forensics professions (e.g., DNA analysis).

Each point of data genealogists use is inspected, cleansed, transformed, and modelled. Most serious genealogists use the Genealogical Proof Standard. While this standard is more qualitative than quantitative, the results are the same, actionable information used to formulate decisions.

The Genealogical Proof Standard follows, simply: Formulating a research question, gathering data sources, considering the information in those sources, formulating evidence from that information, and finally constructing a proof statement. The process is generally iterative since there is no such thing as a final statement of proof in genealogy.

While traditional data analysis is generally thought to be quantitative, there is much similarity to the genealogical research process. The steps in data analysis are analogous to the process used by genealogy professionals. Data analysis begins with a research question, followed by compiling source information, and finally, generating actionable conclusions.

Research Question

Sometimes thought of as a hypothesis, the research question is the beginning of both genealogical research and data analysis. Genealogists formulate a question by asking something such as “Who was Joan Jones’ mother?” Data analysts ask, “How is product A better than product B?” The answers come in basically the same way for both.

Data Collection, Processing, and Cleaning

To answer the research question, both genealogists and data analysts collect, process and classify data relevant to the issue. Almost all data is seen as relevant to analysts, but genealogists often go further, collecting source material relevant not only to the issue, but also surrounding the issue. Data analysts, on the other hand, are more focused on the question itself, locating only data relevant to products A and B.

The difference between traditional and genealogical data analysis is that genealogists have much more fuzzy information to deal with. Items like local and regional history books may include data about their question. Such items are generally not relevant to a data analyst focused on a product research project, unless it involves cultural appropriation, i.e., the Korean car makers’ KIA Tucson vehicle. 😊

Exploratory Analysis

Genealogists often explore different sets of data to glean information and evidence relevant to their questions. Similarly, a traditional data analyst will do the same, focusing more on specific items than general items.

Modelling and Algorithms

There are no “real” algorithms for genealogists to apply to their data findings. There is, however, a Genealogical Data Model, which was constructed to help genealogists apply their data to real-world projects. The Genealogical Data Model was originally constructed to be a basis for software, but since it was completed, no software has used the GDM (except for The Master Genealogist, which used large parts of it).

Data Products and Communications

Genealogists use a proof model to present data and their formulation of the evidence they’ve compiled. A traditional data analyst uses a tool such as business intelligence software to present their findings. The only real difference between the two is that they present findings in a different way.

NPM

Working Wednesday: Gigging at Fiverr

I just put up two gigs on Fiverr (see below) and so far, so good.

The vibe is like how GenLighten operated five years ago before it changed to a subscription model and shut down. There you were able to put up an offering for all to view and buy. At Fiverr you do the same in a comparable way.

The experience at Fiverr is much better, though, as you can see more stats about how well your offers are being received. You can also create links for marketing, which you could not easily do at GenLighten.

Right now, the competition in the Genealogy category seems all right. Most entries in the genealogy / family history section are good, and some not so much. I can’t comment on the quality of the deliverables, though, since I’m a seller, not a buyer.

Here are my two current gig listings:
Full-scale genealogy research
Obituary search

I am thinking about adding a third gig, for proofreading, editing, and writing family histories.

Thoughts?

NPM


Alaska Genealogical Resources

Here’s a link for the Alaska State Library’s genealogy resources. They even have a WorldCat link so you can search for other libraries with the same materials. Some of these materials are also available at Seattle area archives where I’m a researcher available for hire.